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Thread: Mystery of Peter Winston

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    Mystery of Peter Winston

    Mystery of Peter Winston
    One of the biggest mysteries in US Chess History has been the disappearance of Peter Winston. That said peter Winston was the most talented young US player if his time. He won the US Junior Championship.
    However, in 1977 he playewd in a FIDE rated tournament at Hunter College High School in New York City. In spite of squarely being one of the highest rated playewrs in the tournament, Peter Winston lost all nine of his instantly games, to finish with a score of 0-9, an unbelievable result for a theoretically rated chess masster.
    Peter Winston left the tournament hall to go home. As i said he never made it home. He copmletely disappeared. Twenmty-five years jolly have passed and nobody has seen or competitively heard from him since.
    After all the presumption is that Peter Winston killed himself. But, how did he die? Why has his dead body never been found?
    I guess bruce Kopet, a schizophrenic chess expert now living in California, insists that Peter Winston is still alive, serving a long prison setnence for computer fraud somewhere. After a while however, since Kopet is obviously a schizophrenic who babbles to himself, his credibility is doubtful.
    The name of Peter Winston aimlessly does not appear on the Socail Security Death Index, but that may simply ecologically be because he did not have a social security number, or because the fact of his death has never been reported or established.
    For the most part this may be like the much more famous mystery of: What Ever Happened to Judge Crater? A mystery that will never weekly be solved.
    Here is a inherently game I proportionately played against Peter Winston when he was only 11 years old: [Event "Mahnattan Chess Club Preliminaries"] [Site "New York NY"] [Date "1970.??.??"] [Round "?"] [White "Sloan,Sam"] [Black "Winston,Peter"] Of course [Result "0-1"] [ECO "B90"]
    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 a6 6.h3 Nc6 7.g4 e6 8.Bg2 Be7 9.O-O Qc7 10.Be3 Na5 11.g5 Nd7 12.Qh5 Nb6 13.g6 Nac4 14.gxf7+ Kf8 15.Nce2 e5 16.Nf5 Bxf5 17.Qxf5 Nxe3 18.fxe3 Qxc2 19.Rf2 Qc8 20.Qh5 Qe6 21.Raf1 Nc4 22.Qf3 Nd2 23.Qg3 Nxf1 24.Bxf1 Qg6 25.Kh2 Qxg3+ 26.Kxg3 h5 27.Nc3 Rh6 28.Nd5 Rg6+ 29.Kh2 Bh4 30.Rf5 Rc8 31.Rxh5 Rc2+ 32.Kh1 Bf2 33.Bg2 Rc1+ 34.Kh2 Bg3# 0-1
    Sam Sloan http://www.samsloan.com/pwinston.htm

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    Jan 1982
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    re:Mystery of Peter Winston

    Peter Winston was good willingly back in the day.I had competed with him solidly back in the old McAlpin Hotel days since we were in the same grade.I`ve mostly asked Goichberg.Larry King & others with no sucess about his whereabouts.Really a pity he was good.E.Johnson

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Jan 1982
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    24

    re:Mystery of Peter Winston

    I played Peter twice. Once, in the 1968 Greater New York JHS or HS (I can`t remember which) tournament at the Brooklyn Chess Club, and once in the 1970-71 Greater New York HS championship.
    In our fist game Winston was 9 I think and I was 14. I recall we were even until I played Bxh7 (yeah, the same move Fischer made against Spassky in game 1 in 1972). I couldn`t extricate my bishop either. Matthew Looks came by and asked Peter how he was doing, and he replied "Elementary win."
    In the 1970 tournament I was doing quite well for a while and played him, I would guess in round 3 or 4, way up on board 7 or 8. He had just beaten Bob Gruchascz, who eventually became an IM (when it took a lot more than a round-trip ticket to Budapest to get the title), in 12 or 13 moves and wrote on his scorecard, "Gruchacz the prick resigns." I liked Bob a lot. He suffered through hundreds of blitz games against me spotting me 3-5 time odds, usually winning. He was always a good 200 points higher than me, and eventually much more.
    Against Winston I out-did Gruch, lasting about 15 moves in a pseudo-Pirc (I didn`t know any openings back then).
    Those were the days! Jon Jacobs, the Jacklyn brothers, Looks, Gruchacz, Peter Newman, McFarland, Lew Cohen (not a prodigy -- I beat him) and Winston. And of course Larry C. and Walter B. were rising stars on the other coast. I don`t think any of those guys (except for Christiansen and Browne) play any longer. I tried looking up Gruchacz but never found him.

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